glory of god

glory of god

Monday, July 12, 2010

The Post the First

So, until about 5 minutes ago I maintained that blogs are self-indulgent. I enjoy reading various blogs from time to time, but I never thought much about putting up one of my own. And I can't help but think that excessive blogging has contributed to the very polarized Episcopal Church and Anglican Communion that we know today. It's just too easy to compose sharply worded epistles to the world and to spend time and energy criticizing those with whom we disagree. None of that seems to serve the greater purpose of building up the Body of Christ.

So, this blog will endeavor to build up, rather than tear down. An appreciation of Anglican Comprehensiveness will be the theological and ecclesiastical bias employed here (coincidentally, that's the focus of my thesis, too). There will probably be lots of quotations from theological giants like Richard Hooker, F. D. Maurice, Charles Gore, A. G. Hebert, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Norman Pittenger, and the like. The occasional sermon may find its way here. And for a bit of levity, an appreciation of all things Scandinavian (except Lutefisk) will be featured, too.

The title, by the way, is taken from the 1766 novel of the same name by Oliver Goldsmith. It was a particular favorite in the Victorian era. I'm a Rector not a Vicar and I minister in Massachusetts not England, but the title is too perfect not to use. A parishioner gave me a copy of the book on my first day in the parish, so I feel a special connection with it. And my spiritual director always begins our sessions by asking "How is the Vicar of Wakefield," so I've begun to identify with it; although, I hope I'm somewhat less daft than the Rev. Charles Primrose, the novel's title character.

5 comments:

  1. I have lamented that there are not enough good positive Anglican blogs out there. Glad to see you entering the self-indulgent fray. I promise to be a regular follower, O wise (not) Vicar of (Someplace other than) Wakefield.

    DFG+

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  2. You know that "not" was in reference to the word "vicar" and not "wise." I was really trying to call you wise, I just worried that it wasn't going to look that way and I would inadvertently start your first blog flame war.
    DFG+

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  3. Well, I actually am the (not) Vicar in Wakefield. It's just a different Wakefield than the one referenced in the novel.

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  4. I will put you in my RSS feed. Happy blogging.

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  5. I'm subscribing, and would like an annual all-Lutefisk post.

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